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Let's Adapt: the Climate Change Adaptation Game

Let's Adapt games provide fun and engaging ways to teach children and communities about climate change.

Indonesian youth participating in climate games youth training.
Indonesian youth participating in climate games youth training.

Let’s Adapt is a climate change adaptation game designed to teach children and communities about climate change. As climate change threatens the lives of millions in the region, it is critical that the most vulnerable to climate change’s impacts at least know about the threats they are facing.

This game was developed in close partnership with the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre (RCCC) and The Engagement Lab at Emerson College. It was adapted with the help of staff, local partners, teachers, government partners, youth and children associated with Plan Indonesia, Plan Philippines, Plan Thailand, and the Red Crescent Indonesia and Red Cross Philippines chapters.

Why a Game?

It’s true, lessons about climate change are often presented in a very scientific or academic way, in a manner that makes it impossible for most people to grasp and retain. Most countries in the Asia region do include climate change as a topic within their science and social science curricula. Yet due to a lack of capacity and tools, teachers are not able to teach students about these important topics.

Added to this, the most vulnerable communities are rarely able to access this knowledge. Young people in climate risk-prone communities have often left schools by the time they’re in secondary school. These young people are the ones on the frontlines of climate change’s impacts as they witness frequent crop loss due to droughts or storms.

How to Use Let’s Adapt

Let’s Adapt is interactive and visual. It’s designed to be fun but substantial. It allows children and communities to grasp climate change concepts without needing to know all of the terminologies.

Through 6 modules, Let’s Adapt helps children and communities learn:

  • What is climate change?
  • Why it has occurred?
  • What kinds of risks might our communities face?
  • How can we stay safe from climate change’s impacts?
  • What solutions could help?
  • How do we advocate for change and make their voices heard?

Teachers can use Let’s Adapt as a standalone activity to teach children about climate change, or used as a hook to enhance other lessons being taught. Each module takes 30-45 minutes to play, including time for debriefing and discussion. They can be spaced over the course of several weeks, or can also be played in one setting.

Mel and Sandy molding clay at Plan International's Climate Art Workshop
Mel and Sandy molding clay at Plan International's Climate Art Workshop
Thai youth present their handmade creation during the Climate Art Workshop
Thai youth present their handmade creation during the Climate Art Workshop
Indonesian youth enjoying learning about climate change through games.
Indonesian youth enjoying learning about climate change through games.
Filipino youth proudly presents their group work at the Climate Art Workshop
Filipino youth proudly presents their group work at the Climate Art Workshop
Filling out the seasonal calendar is part of the climate change training of trainers workshop in Thailand
Filling out the seasonal calendar is part of the climate change training of trainers workshop in Thailand
Thai teachers participating in climate change training of trainers' activities
Thai teachers participating in climate change training of trainers' activities