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The full brief - for those already interested

A full brief is best used for those who are already interested in the campaign and may want more information on how and why to become actively involved in your campaign.

In your brief it’s best to include:
 

What your campaign is about

Set out the issues and how they can be fixed.
 

Why change is important

Why should your audience care about the issues you are campaigning about and why should they want to become involved? What would a world where change has happened look like?
 

What has already been achieved

Have there been any developments or achievements since you began your campaign?
 

What are the next steps

Mention the specific actions that need to be taken. Do not be vague. Tell your audience exactly what you need them to do e.g. sign a petition, write to their local government representative, join a march or rally.

When addressing an engaged audience, you will often have more time to get your point across. Utilise this time by using a mix of facts and statistics, balanced with personal testimonies from people affected by the issue.

This shows you have done in-depth research, whilst encouraging your audience to empathise with those affected.

Brenda, 16, used her #GirlsTakeover opportunity as First Leader of Central African Republic to discuss girls' rights.
Brenda, 16, used her #GirlsTakeover opportunity as First Leader of Central African Republic to discuss girls' rights.

Quick- fire messaging: ‘the elevator pitch’

Quick-fire messaging is best when you need to communicate your fast to an audience who may not yet be engaged.

Imagine you are in an elevator. You have 1 minute to efficiently let the people you are standing with know about your campaign and what they can do to help.

It’s best to include the key points:
 

  • A brief description of the problem

  • What your campaign is doing to change this

  • Who the target is and what tactics you’re using to influence them

  • How to join

You only have a limited time to tell people about your campaign, so keep your information factual and brief.

This method is a great way to introduce your campaign and may lead to a future opportunity to discuss your campaign in more detail. 

Elssy, speaks to UNICEF's Emergency Team Coordinator about girls' unique needs as part of her #GirlsTakeover.
Elssy, speaks to UNICEF's Emergency Team Coordinator about girls' unique needs as part of her #GirlsTakeover.

Adapted messaging: best for a specific audience

Every time you address a new audience you should adapt your message to directly target them. 

When 16-year-old Greta Thunberg began her 'school strike for the climate’ campaign her message was directed to adults. She sat outside Swedish Parliament’s main building in central Stockholm, with leaflets and addressed those who passed. 

“We kids most often don’t do what you tell us to do. We do as you do. And since you grown-ups don’t give a sh** about my future, I won’t either. My name is Greta and I’m in ninth grade. And I refuse school for the climate until the Swedish general election.”

Her messaging made adults think about what they were doing to help or hinder climate change and what affect that has on the younger generation.

It was a bold and powerful statement that got her point across quickly and succinctly and made people stop and think. She is now the world's most prominent young climate change campaigner.
 


The best messages are

Simple and solution-focused.

They are practical and reasonable in what they ask of their audience. They are evidence based, but, most importantly, they show that there are good reasons why you care about your campaign, and why they should too.

For further tips and inspiration, head back to the Activist Hub.

Back to Activist Hub

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This is a movement for us all. We won't stop until #GirlsGetEqual. 

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