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Masline: I’ll be a role model for other girls

Going to school has helped Masline become a leader and role model in her community. However, unless world leaders increase funding for education when they meet in February 2018, a generation of other girls will be unable to follow their ambitions.

Masline at her home near Harare, Zimbabwe
Masline is taking the lead and speaking out about gender inequality in her community.

Masline is the head girl at her high school near Harare, Zimbabwe.

Call on world leaders to increase education funding “My teachers are proud because it takes a lot to be head girl. It takes confidence, good academic performance, determination and discipline,” she says. 

Masline attends a girls’ empowerment programme run by Plan International, and has been elected as one of 50 ambassadors to represent girls in her town to speak out on their rights.

Gaining confidence, becoming a leader

“When we started out I was so shy, I was not able to talk in front of people, but now I can,” she says. “We raise awareness of gender equality in our community. This experience on top of my school work has been really good for me.

“The best piece of advice I received is about the power of girls and boys working together to achieve gender equality. We understand that anything boys can do, girls can do the same. At first boys thought they were superior but now they understand we are all equal.

“I’m now confident enough to stand in front of people at school, and I take part in drama classes and I write poems. I’m part of the debate team too.” 

Masline interviewing a woman as part of Plan International's girls' empowerment programme
Masline interviewing a woman as part of Plan International's girls' empowerment programme.

Barriers to girls’ education

Masline often writes her poems about early marriages, an issue she is passionate about. In Zimbabwe, 1 in 3 girls are married before their 18th birthday.*

I’d like to teach secondary school pupils because girls need strong role models in life.

Child marriages are not the bridge to success,” she says. “But we must start with the parents, we need to change their outlook. Child marriages must come to an end because they are a hindrance to girls achieving their dreams.”

The cost of education is another barrier that stops girls in Masline’s community from following their ambitions. “I’ve experienced some challenges going to school. Without the help of Plan International I couldn’t have got through secondary school. They pay 75% of my school fees,” she says.

Plan International’s research shows only 33% of girls in Zimbabwe believe they will be able to complete their education due to high costs and pressure from family members to drop out.

Masline being interviewed
Masline is raising awareness about the issues girls face in her community, such as child marriage.

Role models encourage girls

However, Masline knows the importance of having educated women as positive role models to encourage girls to finish their studies and become leaders in their communities.

When girls get a quality education, they are able to lead their own lives and make decisions about their futures.

“A district administrator at school I know is educated and has great experience. She inspired me to inspire other girls to speak out. She is confident and outspoken, she breaks ceilings. After I finish my A-levels I’d like to teach secondary school pupils because girls need strong role models in life.”

Plan International’s Lennart Reinius, says, “When girls get a quality education, they are able to lead their own lives and make decisions about their futures.

“Zimbabwe has had a good education system but due to a lack of economic growth many communities struggle to send their children to school due to the cost. More girls than boys drop out of school due to teenage pregnancy or being married off to an older man. Promoting girls’ access to safe, quality education is to fulfil a human right but it’s also a key long-term investment for the country.”

Masline is part of a girls' empowerment programme run by Plan International
Masline wants to encourage other girls in Zimbabwe to become leaders in their lives and communities.

Leaders must fund girls’ education

On 2 February 2018, government leaders will meet at the Global Partnership for Education Financing Conference in Dakar, Senegal, where they will make financial commitments for education over the next 4 years.

They have set a target of all children being able to go to primary and secondary school for free by 2030 but we risk falling dramatically short of this target.

Call on world leaders to fund girls’ education so more girls like Masline can complete their education and become leaders in their lives and communities, otherwise we may lose the potential of a generation.

Take action for girls’ education

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