Research on the needs of children living with disabilities

This study shows the need to continue funding and supporting services for children from Ukraine living with disabilities in Poland.

Research brief summarising our study on the needs of children from Ukraine living with disabilities in Poland

Many children from Ukraine who are residing in Poland are living with a disability. For many of these children and their families, the experience of conflict and displacement has created challenges in accessing services that enable children to participate in society equally.  

The main challenges facing Ukrainian children living with disabilities in Poland and their families are:

  • The language barrier
  • Lack of information on the services children and families are eligible for
  • Lack of regular and timely access to specialist care
  • Many younger children also struggle to find places at education centres that meet their specific needs 

This study finds that the “Spynka” model of pre-school, which combines childcare and individualised specialist care (such as speech therapy, psychological care and neurological care) for children up to 6, is an effective way of supporting families to navigate these barriers, and providing children and their families with the support they need to thrive. “Spynka” pre-schools are operated in Poland by Fundacja Rozwoju Dzieci (Children Development Foundation), with the support of Plan International. The study finds that these services for Ukrainian children living with disabilities in Poland need continued funding and support. 

The research was conducted through interviews with caregivers, educators and practitioners providing support to children and their families in Wrocław, Łódź, Lublin and Kraków, with support from our partner organisations Fundacja Dajemy Dzieciom Siłę (Empowering Children Foundation), Fundacja Rozwoju Dzieci (Children Development Foundation), Patchwork and Polskie Forum Migracyjne (Polish Migration Forum).

Download the research summary

Research brief

pdf

490 kb

Early childhood development, Education, Emergencies, Children with disabilities, Education in emergencies

Share