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Typhoon Haiyan: Plan International Emergency Response

Overview

Typhoon Haiyan [known locally as Yolanda] which hit the Philippines on 8 November 2013 is the largest storm ever to make landfall. The typhoon left widespread devastation in its wake: it has affected over 14.9 million people, damaged or destroyed 1.2 million homes and displaced more than 4.1 million people – including an estimated 1.8 million children.

Children are especially vulnerable during times of disaster; some will lose their lives, others will lose parents, siblings and extended families. Those who have survived are living in very distressing conditions.

In response to Typhoon Haiyan, Plan has Issued a global appeal for $75 million to cover a comprehensive response and recovery plan to be implemented over five years. This aims to cover at least 264,841 people (approximately 52,968 families) in four of the worst-affected provinces (Eastern Samar, Western Samar, Cebu and Leyte). 

Executive Summary

Executive summary

Plan has Issued a global appeal for $75 million to cover a comprehensive response and recovery plan to be implemented over five years. This aims to cover at least 264,841 people (approximately 52,968 families) in four of the worst-affected provinces (Eastern Samar, Western Samar, Cebu and Leyte). 

Plan staff on the ground are also working with other humanitarian agencies to assess the immediate needs of those affected by the typhoon so we can provide targeted relief to children and families. Since Haiyan made landfall on 8 November, Plan’s teams have been working around the clock delivering life-saving aid in some of the most remote and difficult to reach communities, including food, emergency shelter, clean water, essential sanitation and hygiene supplies.

Plan is recognised for its expertise working with children, and this is where we are focusing our emergency response efforts. Additional work is therefore focusing on child protection and child-centred projects. This includes providing ‘emotional first aid’ to children who have survived the typhoon, creating safe play and educational areas, closely monitoring increases in child trafficking, child labour and potential abuse of boys and girls in the aftermath of the disaster.

Once the immediate needs of survivors have been met, we will work with communities to rebuild and to help survivors get back on their feet.